Category: Business

Building a Stunning Resume

Resumes are underrated. As something most people construct in high school or at the end of college and then fail to update until necessary, the resume does not receive enough credit for how important it can be. When coupled with a well-written cover letter, a great resume can help you secure any job that you’re qualified for. While many employers only seem to glance at your resume, the proof of experience it offers is priceless and there is no better place to show off everything you’ve worked hard to achieve than by presenting a well-made resume.

The Art of the Resume

Many people think it is the embellishment that makes a resume special, but the true beauty of a successful resume is the way it presents the truth and showcases the skills, talents, and experiences in your life that have shaped you into who you are today. While it may be easy to add an extra year of experience or pretend to have experience that you don’t, you shouldn’t do that. Lying on a resume has consequences, sometimes resulting in the loss of a job or pay cuts, not to mention the mistrust your superiors will have because of this dishonesty.

All in all, it is best to avoid lying. Your resume can still be spectacular, even if you feel like you haven’t experienced a lot in life. There are plenty of things that count for experience beyond professions and education. Take an inventory of your skills from all areas of your life thus far, and you are sure to find more than what you’d expect.

Skills In a Resume

The first sections of a resume, be it personal information or past experiences, are straightforward to include all the necessary information. However, the best part of a resume is the section for skills. This is where you can take everything you’ve earned in your career and personal life and craft it to show how you will be a great fit for the job you’re applying for. Maybe you worked in a restaurant for 4 years, then you probably have great customer service and teamwork skills, or perhaps you were in the military and you have acquired perseverance and efficiency.

Things that may not count for on-the-job experiences may still be able to be counted as skills. Skills that may not be occupation related include time management and a strong sense of responsibility from taking care of members of your family. Most employers want to see that you will be able to excel at the job they are offering, and there is more than one way to show that you have the skills and experience to complete the job perfectly.

Let’s Resume

If you’ll pardon the pun, a great idea for making a solid resume is to find a template online and contact your employer directly, or view their website, to see which of your skills and experiences you should highlight the most. Resumes can teach your potential employer a lot about you, so it is a good idea to take time to prepare it. The art of resume building is not a secret science that only some people have access to, you can build a great resume and if you need help there are countless resources online.

18 Wheels that Keep the World Turning

With over 3.5 million drivers on the road, as of 2019 (according to census.gov), the American Trucking Industry is a huge community represented by diverse people from across the nation and the globe! People from all walks of life have become a part of the transportation industry, making this a unifying career field. Drivers across the nation work hard every day to ensure that goods are transported to their destinations safely and timely. This is truly what keeps the American economy going.

The Big Engine That Could

Trucks are big, not only in size and mass, but in economic impact as well. Oftentimes trucks carry thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of dollars worth of goods. This much value in a single route is a big responsibility, but every day there are drivers across the nation making this transport possible. This requires honesty, integrity, and a dedication to one’s career. Drivers have a truly inspiring work ethic.

 Diesel engines may not always be the most efficient, sometimes they break down, but most drivers know how to address any issues and resolve them as quickly and safely as possible.. In the industry, it is never really a case of whether the truck is up for the job or not, but rather the driver because the driver is the most important player in the system. Without dedicated drivers, trade would be at a standstill.

Transportation Nation

The American economy relies on trade across the nation. America is huge, spanning 2,800 miles from coast to coast according to mapsofworld.com. When time sensitive deliveries are in order (especially with produce and other food items), there is always a rush to make sure none of the goods spoil. So, how do goods made on the West Coast arrive so quickly on the East coast and vice versa? Drivers make it possible through taking on loads and tirelessly making journeys to get the goods to their destinations on time! 

A Valiant Effort

Drivers face many challenges daily: hazards of the road, health issues, and difficulties in transport all make it hard on drivers to do their best work, but even then, they do an amazing job of keeping America running. Drivers may see many dangers from traffic incidents, slick roads, high winds, drunk drivers, cargo thieves, and people with malicious intent. They may also suffer through negative health conditions and stress associated with the career..  Drivers are met with adversity nearly every day of their career., Instead of being afraid and refusing to act, they meet these challenges head on and continue making it possible for people across the nation to acquire what they need, shop at their favorite stores, and receive important packages on time.

Thank You Drivers!

Drivers are some of America’s most important citizens, and while they sometimes go underrecognized, they deserve our thanks for the great work they do. Without the 3.5 million drivers in the United States, the nation would be brought to its knees. So today, thank a driver, and if you drive trucks or have ever driven, thank you for your service. You are truly a special person for making the sacrifice to keep America going strong!

Trucking Maintenance Issues

trucking-maintenance-issues

Regular truck maintenance can save time, money, and even a life.  It’s important for the safety of anyone who shares the road that a truck is in good working order, of course, and a truck that is regularly maintained will reduce operational costs.  As the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. This is particularly true for big rigs. It’s significantly cheaper to perform preventative maintenance than it is to have a truck unexpectedly out of commission for costly repairs.  If equipment failure caused an accident, there may also be medical costs, legal expenses, and property damage. Downtime costs a carrier an average of $448-$760 per day, per vehicle and those downtimes can cause expense all the way down the supply chain.

Common Equipment Problems That Cause Accidents

Brakes

According to FMCSA, 29% of accidents caused by truck equipment failure is due to brakes.  A qualified brake inspector needs to check them regularly for air leaks, and that there are no broken parts.  When a fully-loaded truck weighing as much as 80,000 lbs. needs to stop quickly, it needs considerable room and properly-working brakes.  The time to find out that the brakes are bad is not when the truck is rolling along a busy road at 70 MPH.

Tires

Another leading cause of truck accidents is tires that are worn or don’t have adequate air pressure.  It’s the driver’s responsibility to check for leaks, tread wear, and damage before going out on the road.  Trucking companies must make sure that their vehicles have tires that have acceptable tread depth and level of wear.  It only takes one bad tire to cause an accident.

Lights.  

Lights not only allow trucks to see when it’s dark or when visibility is low, they’re equally as important to ensure that trucks are seen by other drivers.  Drivers need to make sure lights are in working order prior to each trip.

Who’s Responsible For Maintenance?

The responsibility for truck maintenance falls on both the fleet owner and the driver.  The FMCSA mandates that drivers inspect their vehicles before and after every trip. They must inspect the brakes, tires, horns, lights, and mirrors and sign a safety report stating that the vehicle is safe to drive.

Carriers have scheduled maintenance checks depending on the vehicle’s mileage, age, and type.  It typically involves a brake inspection, tire pressure check and inflation, alignment and steering check, and checking lighting and electrical systems.

As a part of maintenance, trucks should also be prepared for the change in weather conditions.  Winterization means using the right fuel additives, making sure heaters are working, checking the tire treads, and making sure the truck is equipped with snow chains, sand, extra windshield fluid, and other winter driving necessities.  A quality carrier will follow a strict maintenance program with their vehicles for their drivers’ safety. If you’re looking for a great company that cares about drivers, look no further than Trucker Search. On Trucker Search’s website, you can post your résumé as well as search current truck driving jobs.  It’s a great resource for any driver looking for a great place to work.

Sources:

https://www.elementfleet.com/news/media-coverage/the-true-cost-of-vehicle-downtime

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety/research-and-analysis/large-truck-crash-causation-study-analysis-brief

Truck Drivers: How To Reduce Stress on the Road

Truck-Drivers-How-To-Reduce-Stress-on-the-Road

Traffic, deadlines, bad weather conditions, erratic, unpredictable drivers…life on the open road may sound like a dream to some people but in reality, it can be extremely stressful.  Poor diet options and a sedentary job only add to the stress of driving. If you’re feeling stressed in your job driving a truck, there are some things you can do to reduce that stress and be more relaxed behind the wheel.

  1. Eat healthy foods.  With all of the high-fat, high-sodium, high-calorie fast-food restaurants that line the highways, making healthy food choices can be a challenge.  Try packing healthy snacks from home. Opt for salads from fast food restaurants (they usually have them) or if you don’t have a healthy option, cut your portion size in half and drink water with it instead of soda.  Never supersize!
  2. Exercise.  When you’re under a deadline, fitting in time to exercise can be difficult but try to get out of your truck and go for a short walk whenever you can.  Stretching is also a good way to release stress.  
  3. Be with your family.  Even if you can’t be there physically, Skype with them or talk on the phone and take the time to listen to what’s going on in their lives.  When you do have time at home, be present for your family.
  4. Occupy your mind.  While you’re driving, listen to your favorite music or a podcast about something that interests you.  It’ll help you forget about the traffic for a while and make the time fly.
  5. Get enough good sleep.  It can be difficult to find a quiet spot to park your truck and sleep at truck stops and rest areas.  Trucks are loud and if you or someone around you is driving a reefer, the truck will run all night. Earplugs or a white noise machine may help.  Getting at least 8 hours of sleep each night, at home or on the road, helps keep you alert on the road, healthy, and reduces stress.
  6. Meditate.  Mediation can be done anywhere and at any time (except while driving!).  Simply sit comfortably and close your eyes. Focus on your breathing and try to push all thoughts out of your mind.  If you prefer to keep your eyes open, pick an object and focus on that. Meditation calms the mind and lowers anxiety and stress levels.
  7. Take time for yourself.  When you’re at home, take time to do something you enjoy.  Your time on the road isn’t for you?it’s for your employer and your family.  While you’re at home, you’ll want to spend time with your family but taking time for yourself is important too.

If you’re looking to start a career behind the wheel of a big rig, Trucker Search can help. Connecting truck drivers and employers is what we do.  It’s quick, it’s easy, and it can get you that dream job on the open road. Get started today at TruckerSearch.com or call us at (888)254-3712.    

How To Prepare for Winter Driving

how-to-prepare-for-winter-driving

Winter weather is unpredictable.  It can go from clear and sunny to icy and treacherous before you can say, “Winter Wonderland”. Many drivers start routes in a warm, sunny state and end in one covered in snow.  Being prepared can mean the difference between delivering your load on time and sitting in a frozen truck waiting for help.

With some mindfulness and preparedness, you can be ready for anything that Mother Nature throws at you.

Inspect Your Truck

Make sure it’s ready for cold temperatures.  Check your tires’ pressure and treads, oil, antifreeze, and windshield wiper fluids.  

Pack Necessities

In freezing temperatures, fuel can begin to freeze in the tank, fuel line, and filter if you’re not using a winter blend fuel.  Be sure to have some fuel additives with anti-gelling agent on board in case your fuel begins to gel. Having an extra blanket, warm clothes, and gloves can keep you warm if you have no heat. It’s also smart to have things that can help if  you’re stuck in snow or ice like sand, a shovel, traction mats, and salt. Some other useful items are a flashlight, a lighter or matches, jumper cables, food, water, and extra windshield washer fluid. Also, always keep your phone charged.  

Adjust Your Driving If The Weather is Bad

Often, winter accidents happen because drivers don’t slow down in icy or snowy weather.  It may be tempting to keep your speed up to make deliveries on time but getting into an accident will really throw off your schedule.  High speed decreases traction when you need it most.

Hang Back

You may need some extra stopping distance in case an accident happens in front of you.  Winter driving means defensive driving.

React Smoothly

Sudden reactions like sudden braking, accelerating, and turning during slick road conditions are dangerous and can cause an accident for you or others on the road.

Pull Over

If you think the weather is too dangerous to drive in, don’t.  Find a safe place to ride out the storm. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

Watch For Wind Gusts

High winds can take you by surprise.  Be cautious when driving in open areas and on mountains, especially if you’re hauling an empty trailer.

Check the Weather Often

Know what you’re driving into even if you have all your safety supplies.  Weather can change quickly so check often.

Be Careful on Bridges

As the signs say, bridges freeze first and in many areas, they are not treated with sand or salt.

Winter driving means driving cautiously and being prepared for the worst.  A bad storm can slow you down but if you are prepared and drive carefully, you just may deliver your load safely and on time.  

If you’re a driver looking for a great company to work for, Trucker Search can help.  Post your resume or search our growing database of companies’ driving job postings. Visit Trucker Search today to find out more.

Cooling Economy Causes Drivers to Lose Their Jobs in September

cooling-economy-causes-drivers-to-lose-their-jobs-in-september

Since the beginning of 2019, the trucking industry has been in a recession.  The rates for shipping freight have dipped to an all-time low and it’s hit the industry hard. Drivers are scraping for jobs and 640 trucking companies went into bankruptcy, 3 times the bankruptcies over previous year.  Roadrunner announced it would cut 10% of its workforce.

What’s going on?  When factories are doing well, retail is booming, and new construction is cropping up everywhere, the trucking industry does well.  It’s simple supply and demand. Last year, the trucking industry was booming and drivers reaped the rewards. To keep up with demand, trucking companies have been increasing their fleets, adding trucks and drivers. In early 2019, they were at capacity, meaning there were enough trucks and drivers to meet the current demand.  What this means, unfortunately, is that rates fall, and with costs not falling too, many trucking companies have been forced into layoffs, or worse?closure.  The cost of fuel has not gone down and neither have insurance costs which have made it difficult for owner/operators and trucking companies to keep going. Even cold storage companies that tend to do well weathering poor economic times have been hit hard with industry leaders slashing their payrolls.

The good news is that although manufacturing is down, retail spending is rising so 2019 isn’t a loss yet.  If consumer confidence can rise for the upcoming holiday buying season, rates may rise too.

 

Become More Marketable to Find Work

If you want to stay on top during the good times as well as slowdowns, you need to make yourself more marketable to trucking companies than other drivers.  You need to stand out from the rest and there are several ways to accomplish this.

Get Endorsements

Endorsements to your CDL show that you have trained to carry various types of loads which will make you more appealing to a trucking company.  Endorsements for double trailers, tankers, hazardous materials, etc. require extra training and certification. Having them makes you more attractive to potential employers and will probably earn you higher pay as well.  If you’re an owner/operator, it’ll open you up to more loads.

Change locations.  

The economy in some areas of the country may be better than others so there may be better prospects in other regions and could affect your salary too.  The 2017 median income for truck drivers in the U.S. was $44,500  but remote areas like Alaska paid $56,250 and there may be more job opportunities for drivers willing to drive in urban areas like New York City.

Continue to get experience.  

Even if earnings are lower than last year, try to stick it out.  Put in those hours where you can. The more experience you have, the greater the chances of keeping your job or finding a new one.

Find the right company.  

Even with trucking companies laying off drivers, you can find a great company to work for.  If you’ve been laid off and need to find a new company, Trucker Search can help. It’s an important tool in the search for employment opportunities in the trucking industry.  On Trucker Search’s website, you can post your résumé (which is a short form application) as well as search the up-to-date database of companies looking for reliable drivers.  It’s a great resource for any driver looking for employment in a good economy or bad. Go to TruckerSearch.com today and start driving tomorrow.  

 

Sources:

https://www.businessinsider.com/trucking-truck-drivers-job-loss-september-2019-10

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-trucking-industry-slowdown-trucker-job-loss-2019-7#trucking-is-highly-cyclical-and-were-coming-off-from-a-massive-uptick-in-the-market-1

https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes533032.htm#st

Hiring Military Veterans to Solve the Driver Shortage

hiring-military-veterans-to-solve-the-trucker-shortage

There’s been concern in the trucking industry about the current driver shortage and its effect on business and the economy; both now and in the future with good reason.  At the end of the second quarter of 2018, the shortage ballooned to a driver shortfall of nearly 300,000. With the current high number of retirements and the low number of incoming applicants, that number is only expected to grow.  

It may be a boon to truckers who can be more selective with the companies they choose to drive for, and the loads they choose to haul. Many companies are offering sign-on bonuses and other perks to attract drivers. 

Aside from bonuses, trucking companies are looking for other ways to obtain more drivers such as trying to attract more women and recent high school graduates to the profession.  There’s also a push by trucking companies to hire military veterans to fill seats, regardless of their field of expertise while in the military.

Here’s why it’s a great idea:

The military lifestyle is a regimented one.  Although the trucker lifestyle has a reputation for being carefree, it is in fact, a very structured and detail-driven profession.  Rules need to be followed, safety procedures have to be adhered to, and deadlines need to be met. This type of structure may take some getting used to for civilians who are new to the field but it may be a natural fit for military veterans.  While both jobs are regimented, they also allow significant independence.  

Time on the road.  There can be substantial  time away from home and family for extended time periods.  This isn’t easy for everyone but it is something that veterans have had experience with at some point so it may come a little easier.  Fortunately, times away from home as a trucker are usually a week at a time instead of a year deployment.  

Veterans have high safety standards.  Military members are taught from Day One of Basic Training how to live up to high standards, a trait that’s highly desired by trucking companies.  Both industries have a strong commitment to safety. In the military, safety is most important for military members’ wellbeing as well as for civilians.  Drivers also follow strict safety standards for themselves and anyone else sharing the road with them.  

Veterans may have a head start.  Many military veterans have their CDLs and/or experience driving large vehicles, and are familiar with the maintenance.  If not, there is an exemption for the road test called the “Military CDL Skills Waiver” which allows veterans who have operated certain heavy machinery to skip the road test portion of the CDL test.  To see who qualifies, visit FMCSA.  If CDL training is still required, it may be shortened depending on military experience.  Other programs for military veterans can be found here.       

For trucking companies, the benefits of hiring veterans is clear.  Aside from getting dedicated, hard-working employees, it’s a chance to pay back individuals who have done so much for the protection and freedom of our country.  Military personnel have qualities like independence, discipline, organization, dedication, and courage, trucking companies are more than eager to hire them.  

The similarities between the military and trucking industries can make the transition for veterans from a military job to a civilian job much easier.  If you’re a military veteran looking to start a career in the trucking industry, Trucker Search is the place to start. You can post your resume or search our vast database of companies looking for drivers to join their teams.  Visit Trucker Search and begin your new career today.

 

Sources:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-01/how-a-trucking-shortage-is-fueling-u-s-inflation-quicktake

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/military-skills-test-waiver-program

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/commercial-drivers-license/military-driver-programs

What is Per Diem Pay?

what-is-per-diem

Per diem pay is a benefit that truck drivers may receive that allows them to recoup expenses from being on the road, like meals, without having to wait until tax season to file a claim.  “Per diem” means “per day” and the allowable 2019 per diem amount according to the IRS is $66, up from $63.

Benefits of Per Diem Pay 

Aside from getting a reimbursement right away for daily expenses that come along with being on the road for extended periods, there are other benefits to receiving per diem pay.  While the main benefit is receiving the payment right away, per diem pay reduces the amount of gross income the driver reports which means it might increase eligibility for public assistance or student loans because claimed income is less.  Companies who pay their drivers per diem pay are the ones who are responsible for dealing with taxes properly so the driver doesn’t have to.

Disadvantages of Per Diem Pay

There are few disadvantages to receiving per diem pay.  Because per diem pay decreases taxable income, less money is paid into Social Security and Medicare as well as into unemployment security. The amount of eligible unemployment or worker’s compensation benefits will be less if there’s ever a need to use them.  Per diem pay is also not eligible for 401K employer matches but it’s easy to make arrangements to invest some of your extra take-home pay into retirement accounts.  

Tax Code Changes

The per diem deduction used to be a benefit that all truckers could claim. However, changes in the tax code in the 2018 tax year stripped eligibility for drivers who worked for trucking companies.  It repealed the individual miscellaneous itemized deductions for unreimbursed business expenses. Drivers are able to use the standardized deduction rates ($12,000 for individuals, $24,000 for married filing jointly) but whether or not this makes up for the loss of per diem deduction depends on the specifics for each taxpayer.  For many, however, the tax change was costly.  

By losing their per diem deduction, most company drivers paid more in taxes starting in the 2018 tax year.  Before the tax changes, many truckers were deducting nearly $15,000, several thousand more than the new standardized deduction.  Even with the lowering of tax rates, the change made the amount of taxable income higher, resulting in higher taxes. In many cases, company drivers didn’t merely lose their refund but rather ended up having a several thousand dollar tax bill.  Drivers should consult with a tax advisor to see how the changes affected their taxes.  

Who Can Still Benefit?

Fortunately, companies can still offer a per diem pay benefit to their drivers and many still do.  Those drivers who are owner/operators are still eligible for the deduction and can still claim 80% of the per diem rate from their taxes.

Whether you’re an owner/operator or you’re just looking for a great company to drive for, Trucker Search can help you with your search.  Go to TruckerSearch.com today and post your resume or search the extensive database of companies who need drivers like you. 

Sources:

https://www.trustbgw.com/blog/2018/10/02/per-diem-rates-tax-reform/

https://www.irs.gov/publications/p501

https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2019/04/trump-tax-bill-truckers-truck-drivers-deduction/

Husband and Wife Team Drivers

husband-and-wife-team-drivers

Life on the road can be tough.  Sure, there’s the freedom of the open road, independence, and good pay but there is also traffic, bad food, and the monotony of the highway.  Arguably, the hardest part of the life of a truck driver is the loneliness. If you’re a long haul driver, the long days and even longer nights can take a  toll on your mental wellbeing.   

To combat the loneliness that  comes with the solitude on the open road, many drivers bring their dog, children, and even spouses so they have company.  However, more and more frequently, both spouses are earning their CDL and are driving long trucking routes together as a team.  

Advantages of Driving with Your Spouse

 There’s the obvious advantage of driving with a spouse:  money. Hours of Service restrictions mean mandatory rest periods but if there are two eligible drivers, one can rest while the other one drives.  It reduces living expenses as you may not need a house as much as you merely need a home base.  

The limited stopping time makes husband and wife teams particularly attractive to carriers who can cut delivery times sometimes by as much as half which makes them willing to pay the premium for husband and wife driving teams.  Husband and wife teams are in high demand because they can more easily handle the long hours and make deliveries faster.  

Aside from staving off loneliness, having your partner on the road with you can keep you more active.  You may be more inclined to walk or do other activities if you have your spouse with you and making time for some sightseeing and fun while you’re out there can add happiness and relieve stress.

Driving with your spouse is better than team driving with someone you are not married to.  In other teams, there may be conflicts in the sleeping situation or choice in music or driving style.  Usually, spouses are more on the same page than non-related driving teams.   

Having a partner with you can make life on the road easier and even safer.  Your spouse can help you navigate cities, assist with keeping records, communicate with dispatchers while you keep your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel.  

Communication is the key to the longevity of any marriage, and communication can be significantly easier when your spouse is in the seat next to you!  Just being away from one another for extended periods can put a strain on even the closest relationships. Driving together as a team may help you and your spouse to remain close.    

 Disadvantages of Driving with Your Spouse

Not all relationships can survive life on the road.  Just because you love your spouse and you’re a great team at home, it doesn’t mean that you’ll make a good team on the road.  Spending all your time with the same person all the time may work for some but may cause arguments and fractures in the relationship for others.  Keep in mind that if one sleeps while the other drives, it could seem like you’re not spending much time together at all. This could be a good or bad thing. 

While having one spouse on the road as the other stays at home to raise children is difficult, having both on the road makes that impossible.  For husband and wife teams with grown children, team driving may be a welcome change but younger teams may have to put off the dream of a having family if that’s something they want, while they’re driving together.

 

For the right couple, team driving can be a lucrative and enjoyable adventure that allows you to see the country together.  Trucker Search is the only tool you need if you’re a driving team looking to work for a great company. On Trucker Search’s website, you and your spouse can post your résumés and search the comprehensive database of driving jobs.  Team drivers are in high demand and Trucker Search is a great resource for any team looking for a great place to work.

 

Sources:

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/summary-hours-service-regulations

Why Driving a Truck is a Great Career

why-driving-a-truck-great-career

“Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me, as is ever so on the road.”?Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Many people have a little Jack Kerouac in them, drawn to the open road and wherever it may lead but they never really act on it other than the occasional road trip across a couple of states.  For others, life on the road is not only a big part of life, but also a stable and rewarding career. They are drawn to driving a truck because of its independence and freedom. Truck drivers are not tied to a desk or stuck inside of a factory?the outside world is their office!  

Drivers are an important link in the country’s supply chain.  Whether they’re moving freight from a warehouse to a plane for further transport, from a train to a store, or from a manufacturer to your doorstep, truck drivers keep it all moving.

For owner/operators, there’s a great deal of independence.  They negotiate rates and often set their own hours, running their own business from a truck that they own or lease.  With one truck, you can be a small business owner with control over your career. 

Of course, if you don’t want the responsibility of maintaining and operating your own truck, there are many carriers who are looking for reliable drivers to join their teams.  They do the planning and negotiating and you just drive.    

Drivers can earn excellent wages.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median income for truck drivers in 2018 was $43,680 a year and owner/operators can more than double that amount.  The recent driver shortage has not only caused carriers to offer sign-on bonuses, but also more flexible hours and shorter routes when possible.  Some carriers will even pay for drivers to earn their CDL with the stipulation that they work for the company upon completion. They need drivers now and many are willing to go the extra mile to find and keep the good ones.

Driving a truck isn’t easy.  The hours are long, the highway can be monotonous, and the lifestyle is often a lonely one.  To the right person, on the other hand, the independence, self-sufficiency, and the feeling of community with other drivers can feel like home.  You may have to load and unload your freight and need to have some basic knowledge of truck mechanics in case of a breakdown.

No matter if you drive for a carrier or drive your own truck, there are regulations to follow.  Hours of Service rules require that drivers work no more than 14 consecutive hours including the loading and unloading of cargo, taking care of paperwork, etc.  Between shifts, drivers must spend 10 hours not working before being eligible to drive again.  

One of the major advantages to being a truck driver is the job security.  With the ATA prediction that the driver shortage could reach 160,000 by 2028, carriers will be eager to retain the drivers they have.  It also has carriers expanding their search for new drivers. Many offer help for veterans who may be looking for a career change and more and more women are joining the trucking industry and finding success.  

Life on the road isn’t for everyone but for the right person, every day can be an adventure.  If driving a truck is the life for you, Trucker Search can help you find a great company to start a career.  Post your resume or search our growing database of companies in search of drivers to join their teams. Start your new career in trucking by visiting Trucker Search today.

 

Sources:  

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/heavy-and-tractor-trailer-truck-drivers.htm

https://www.trucking.org/ATA%20Docs/News%20and%20Information/Reports%20Trends%20and%20Statistics/ATAs%20Driver%20Shortage%20Report%202019%20with%20cover.pdf