Category: truck drivers

How the Suez Canal crisis may affect trucking

The story of the quarter mile-long Ever Given cargo ship becoming beached in the Suez Canal has been all over the media recently. Blocking one of the world’s most important shipping routes for 6 days, the stalling of the Ever Given has created a crisis that has cost billions in trade and has slowed down shipping for weeks due to the backlog of ships. So, what does this have to do with the transportation of goods on trucks in the United States?

It may have a considerable impact. Even though domestic goods can be shipped as scheduled, international imports may be severely delayed, leading to disrupted routes and a lull in transportation, until the effects of the crisis are mitigated. There are many benefits to participating in a globalized economy of the 21st century including decreased costs of importing and exporting goods, but when a major crisis occurs such as in the Suez Canal, almost every industry whether international or domestic can expect to take a hit.

Suez Canal

The Suez Canal is the largest canal in the World without locks (locks are mechanically operated dams that change the water levels of an area allowing them to be raised and lowered to accommodate the change in topography between two bodies of water). The canal was first constructed in 1869 by French Investors taking advantage of the thin stretch of land between mainland Egypt and the Isthmus of Suez to provide a more expedient trade route from Asia to Europe.

Since then, it has provided a major international shipping lane which reduces the duration of transit by an average of 10 days from alternative routes. Other major blockages include the Suez Crisis in 1956 and a blockage by a Russian ship in 2004. Each blockage of the canal has reinforced the appreciation of the importance of this trade route in international commerce.

Sticky Situation

A few weeks ago the Ever Given, a Taiwanese cargo ship, was grounded as it was pushed into the shallows of the Suez Canal by strong winds. This colossal ship blocked the canal off and required a large team of engineers and tugboats to free the ship, 6 days after it had been stuck. This sticky situation caused over 400 ships to be backlogged at the canal, and countless others to be delayed as they were redirected to go around the Cape of Good Hope at the bottom of the African continent, which adds another 10 days on average to the journey.

The cost of goods being delayed because of this crisis is estimated to be around $9.6 billion, or around $6.7 million per minute of the blockage. This has a major economic impact on industries around the globe as this is a large amount of goods that are delayed. 

The Domestic Economic Issue with the Crisis

The Suez Canal incident may have serious domestic implications, especially when imported goods are expected to arrive at a specific time. It is likely that the supply chain will be slowed for a long time until returning to normal due to the huge impact of the blockage. In addition to the slow down, some goods may not be able to be transported as perishable shipments may have to be discarded because of their time-sensitive nature. Imported food shipments may be reduced during this time because of the perishable goods being thrown out.

Even with the devastating effect on the economy and effectiveness of the supply chain through the Suez Canal, the global market will recover soon. The people that maintain the canal now know how to resolve blockages more rapidly in the future. The trucking industry will likely take a small financial hit, especially in the imported goods sector, but huge losses and delays are unlikely.

Sources:
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56559073
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/25/world/middleeast/suez-canal-container-ship.html
https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/03/29/world/suez-canal-stuck-ship

Tips to extend the life of your DPF and keep filters running cleaner

If you’re like most people, breathing is probably one of your favorite activities. It’s definitely an important function for remaining alive, and breathing clean air makes the experience all the more positive. For this reason, alongside the societal health benefits of reducing pollution, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated in 2007 that DPFs (Diesel Particulate Filters) be installed in vehicles that use diesel as a fuel source to keep excess soot out of the air we breathe.

DPFs are great for the environment and the health and safety of people that live near heavily driven roads, but they can be expensive when not properly maintained. Allowing your DPF to regenerate often, keeping track of the miles you have traveled, and paying attention to any warning lights can help ensure your DPF is functional and effective for as long as possible, which can save you time and money. 

A Little Particulate

DPFs filter the emissions from the engine and collect the fine particulates that come from burning diesel fuel and residual engine oil before releasing the filtered air into the environment. These filters catch soot and ash that tend to build up in the DPF until a process called regeneration takes place. The regeneration process is where the real magic happens when it comes to prolonging the life of your DPF. This occurs when the temperature of the exhaust is high enough to burn off the soot and ash. 

Keeping Your DPF Healthy

There are some actions you can take to keep your DPF cleaner for longer, preventing the need for regeneration or costly repairs that come from avoidable mistakes. The three main things to pay attention to when watching out for the health of your DPF are: engine cleanliness, engine heat at startup, and the type of fuel you use. Making sure to follow these tips will prolong the life of your DPF, which will save you time and money in the future.

Having clean cylinders (meaning free of residual oil) will ensure that fewer particles will enter your DPF.  This is because most of the soot and ash particles are caused by the combustion of engine oil that contains additives, which promote the health of your engine, but create particulates when burned. Watching the consumption of your engine oil and keeping track of it can help to show how clean your cylinders are and if there is an issue that needs to be addressed to reduce particulate buildup.

In extreme cold warming up the engine using a coolant heater is an effective way of promoting the efficiency of your vehicle while reducing the amount of soot and ash created. Allowing the engine time to become thoroughly warmed will keep your truck from idling too long and is easier on your engine than the cold-start method. The final measure you can take is monitoring what kind of fuel you use in your truck. Traditional petroleum diesel can have many particulate-causing compounds, but biodiesel burns more cleanly and efficiently. If possible, opt for biodiesel to extend the life of your DPF.

Final Thoughts

Promoting the health of your DPF by following these simple steps can help you save money from costly repairs and replacements. It will also help protect the environment from harmful emissions. Keeping your DPF from being overloaded with particulates is truly a win-win for everyone. 

Sources:
https://www.overdriveonline.com/equipment/article/15064706/3-tips-to-extend-dpf-life-and-keep-filters-running-clean
https://www.uti.edu/blog/diesel/diesel-particulate-filters

Trucking Industry Role in Distributing the Covid Vaccinations

covid-vaccinations-trucking-industry

Tackling the pandemic has been on the minds of drivers since the beginning. From distributing daily essentials to ensuring vaccines will make it to their administration locations on time, truck drivers have provided a means for all of this to happen effectively. With the return to an almost pre-pandemic volume of trucks on the road, there is a new aspect of the industry to be explored and that is the logistical demands of vaccine transport and delivery.

Logistical Legends

While many transportation vehicles, of all varieties, will be used to ensure that vaccines are being transported throughout the country and worldwide, trucks are the most prevalent means of getting vaccines to where they are needed. Even after a vaccine shipment leaves a boat or plane, a truck will then transport it to its destination. Speed is crucial in the vaccination process, as of right now, due to the need throughout the nation and the requirement that the vaccines be kept cold to remain effective.

Many trucks have been fitted with new equipment to preserve the extremely cold temperatures necessary for the vaccine to be properly stored. Some companies have created specially designed containers to keep everything cool as well. According to CNBC, the only companies shipping vaccinations throughout the nation are the largest logistical organizations in the country, UPS and FedEx. They have decided to divide the states into groups that each respective company will ship the vaccines to in a “divide and conquer” strategy.

A Major Role

Huge shipments of vaccines are currently being transported all over the nation, and this will likely continue until most people have received vaccinations and there is no longer a need. This will likely take a while as vaccines can only be produced so fast. Even with one of the best logistical systems in the world working as quickly as possible, there are still limitations. However, it is truly incredible to think of the speed at which even the smallest of towns and largest of cities are receiving vaccinations to keep their populations safe.

Truck drivers play a crucial role in the supply chain as they are the bridge between producer and consumer. Without the bridge, the entire system would collapse. With the increase in vaccine production and need, truck drivers across the nation have stepped up to ensure that the bridge is strong and wide enough for adequate numbers of vaccinations to be provided. This is a difficult and stressful undertaking, and we would like to thank every driver that has taken part in distributing vaccines.

Unsung Heroes

Truck drivers across the nation, from those who have transported vaccines to those who ensure the store shelves are filled are the unsung heroes of the pandemic. They have transported these items everywhere that they have been needed, even when times were uncertain. Even though many drivers will likely not be a part of the vaccine distribution process, all drivers are important to the health and safety of all people in our nation and beyond.

Truck driving is a difficult, yet rewarding career, and there is definitely no greater reward than knowing that you are keeping thousands of people safe just by doing your job. Thank you to all drivers who have worked during this pandemic. Without you, things would have been much worse. With your hard work and dedication, we are on the path to rebuilding and becoming better than ever before!

Reducing Stress while Truck Driving

“That stresses me out!” This is a phrase that we hear often about a variety of subjects. Stress is something that all people deal with to some degree, as it is a biological response to a stimulus that is perceived as being dangerous or concerning. Stress is a feeling of physical tension and anxiety and cortisol, the primary hormone associated with stress, is known to raise blood pressure and increase heart rates in those with higher-than-normal levels.

The Wear of the Road

Truck driving can be a very rewarding career with the ability to travel across the nation and solid pay after a few years of experience. However, this can also be a very stressful career as it is fast-paced, full of responsibility, and hugely schedule-dependent. Managing the safety of your cargo while providing expedient transport is a big responsibility, and can be very anxiety-inducing when it seems like you cannot make it to your destination on time.

These worries, coupled with long hours, can lead to a lot of stress which can be unhealthy for extended periods of time. This keeps your body running in survival mode which can lead to many ill effects on your health like, an increased risk of heart attack and stroke (According to the American Psychological Association). The good news is that stress is manageable with some effort and this means that you can remain calm and secure even in the worst situations.

Stress Management Tips

Stress seems like an insurmountable wall when you experience it firsthand, but it is possible to overcome the anxiety of the moment. One of the best things to remember when facing a stressful situation is that it will not last forever, and you will be free from it soon. If you find yourself experiencing stress, try to breathe slowly and evenly to lower your heart rate and blood pressure to reduce the panic response your body is producing. It may help to go to a quiet room or pull off at a truck stop to walk around for a minute or two. After you have initially calmed down, it is important to address the stress.

The best way to keep stress under control is by being aware of the things that cause you stress and learning how to better approach them before they upset you. Writing down things that cause you stress, and attempting to remove your exposure to them can be one strategy of reducing the number of stressors you are exposed to. If you cannot avoid the things that are stressing you out, it may be a good idea to find ways to better cope with them- this may take time and some compromise. For example, if you find yourself worrying about time, it can be a good idea to write down a schedule and try to stick to it. Simply writing down tasks you need to complete or times you need to arrive at various destinations can help you reduce the load on your brain and keep your thoughts organized.

A Note of Encouragement

Stress can be difficult and unhealthy, but it is possible to reduce the amount of stressful thoughts. Getting organized and giving yourself mental breaks, while trying to maintain regular breathing, goes a long way in reducing the stress you may experience. There are plenty of resources, with a wide array of strategies, available to help keep your stress at bay. Some may work better than others, so it is important to explore and find the strategy that is best for you. 

Cargo Securement Tips of the Trade to Avoid Downtime

cargo-securement-tips-of-the-trade-to-avoid-downtime

Depending on how you’ve been taught, you might think that a strap is a strap and a chain is a chain. Securing your cargo might be something you haven’t given a lot of thought to in a while. Something to think about is that there are rules in place that you could be unknowingly violating. These rules are in place in an effort to avoid causing damage to other motorists on the road.

Understanding the proper way to tie down and secure loads improves highway safety and keeps you from the lengthy downtimes involved with violating the rules set out by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA).

The specific rules to follow come from an older set of regulations given by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) that took effect in 2004.

The general overview of these rules can be summed up in the following: “Cargo must be firmly immobilized or secured on or within a vehicle by structures of adequate strength, dunnage (loose materials used to support and protect cargo) or dunnage bags (inflatable bags intended to fill space between articles of cargo or between cargo and the wall of the vehicle), shoring bars, tiedowns or a combination of these.”

A rule of thumb to go by from these rules is that one tie down is required for items 5 ft. or less in length and under 1,100 lbs. Two tie downs are required for items 5 ft. or less in length and more than 1,100 lbs., or greater than 5 ft but less than 10 ft. long, regardless of weight. An extra tie down is required for every additional 10 ft.

Officers from CVSA enforce these rules during their routine roadside inspections of tractor-trailers and their drivers. If a truck driver is found in noncompliance, their truck can be taken out of service due to inspection item violations.

The concern, from the CVSA officers, is that improperly secured items can fall off the trailer and damage, injure, or even kill other motorists. The item itself might not directly cause a fatality, but a flying, bouncing, and fast approaching object on the road can cause accidents that could possibly lead to a fatality.

New drivers are spooked easily and aren’t accustomed to objects hitting their windshield. Older drivers with declining vision and reaction time, are also susceptible to crashes involving unexpected hazards.

In addition to following proper securement rules, routine checks of strap conditions not only help secure the load, but can also prevent unplanned downtime due to a failed CVSA inspection.

A variety of things can damage your straps. Get ahead of this and regularly check straps for cuts, burns, fraying, or other damage.

In cases where you do find damaged straps, replace the strap immediately. Spending a little bit of money now can prevent a significant loss of money due to downtime if the strap fails or is found to be damaged during an inspection. Having extra straps in the cab of your truck is highly recommended.

Truck Driver Mask Mandate?

truck-driver-mandate

Due to recent events, there are many questions swirling around asking if truck drivers need to wear masks while driving. The President has issued executive orders that require facial coverings to be worn on federal lands and during interstate travel. Does this apply to you? We break it down below.

On January 21 2021, President Biden issued this executive order and there’s been some confusion about it ever since. What is clear is that masks are now required for interstate travel on commercial aircrafts, trains, public maritime vessels, and any kind of hub or facility where people gather to use these modes of transportation.

Since this news broke, truck drivers everywhere have been questioning if this new mandate applied to them.

The short answer is that truck drivers are not mandated to wear a mask while operating their vehicle under this executive order from the President.

There is more to unpack however, so we’re offering a longer answer below.

Since the executive order, there has been an additional order that helps clarify what this new mask mandate means for truck drivers. The follow up order that came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on January 29 added helpful information as it pertains to commercial motor vehicles (CMV) operators engaged in interstate travel.

Like everyone else, all CMV operators are required to wear a facial covering at transportation hubs. Put simply, where people are out of their vehicles and crossing paths with one another, you have to wear a mask. These places include private facilities, such as shipping and receiving stations, as well as public places such as truck stops.

Here’s what you really might be wondering about: the CDC order specifically exempts truck drivers from wearing a mask if they are the “sole occupant of the truck.”

What does that mean for team truck drivers? What if they are from the same household? Are they exempt?

These are issues that are left unclear from the CDC follow up to the executive mask mandate.

However, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) indicates that team truck drivers are indeed required to wear masks inside the vehicle while traveling. Whether or not the drivers are from the same household.

From the guidance there are, however, some exceptions to the mask requirements. These exceptions include the following:

  • Team truck drivers can take their masks off inside the vehicle for brief periods of time when eating, drinking, or taking medications.
  • They can also take off their mask if they are communicating with someone who is hearing impaired and the ability to see mouth movement is essential for communication.
  • A mask can be removed from another team truck driver is they are found unconscious, incapacitated, unable to be awakened, or cannot remove their own mask for a given reason.
  • If a law enforcement officer needs to verify a truck driver’s identity during a traffic stop, the mask can be removed for a short period of time.
  • Additional exceptions for removing one’s mask include if a truck driver is experiencing shortness of breath or is sick and vomiting.

Popular Truck Driver Magazines

popular-truck-driver-magazines

Magazines are a convenient and entertaining way to stay up to date on news, technologies, and stories pertaining to a wide array of interests. There are magazines for virtually every industry, and truck driving is no exception. In 2016, the Census reported that 3.5 million people are employed as truck drivers. There are a great number of national and regional magazines for everyone associated with the industry, but some are more popular than others because of the reliability and applicability of their content. Here are 5 of the most popular national truck driver magazines in the United States.

Overdrive

Overdrive is a general truck driver magazine started in 1961 that offers news on everything from product reviews, and regulations to custom trucks, and industry news. Consistently rated in the top 5 in popularity lists for truck drivers, Overdrive has a wide appeal and a long-term commitment to providing news for truck drivers all over the nation! Besides being a dependable publication, Overdrive subscriptions are free to anyone who would like one.

Commercial Carrier Journal

Commercial Carrier Journal (CCJ) has the same publisher as Overdrive, Randall-Reilly, LLC. CCJ is dedicated more specifically to fleet owners and managers, but it has interesting information for any driver as it covers the latest technologies and equipment reviews. CCJ is a great source for learning more about the industry and the business and management side of things. This publication aims to make industry and tech information accessible and free to all drivers and managers.

Land Line

Land Line magazine was started in 1975 after the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) decided that it needed a way to communicate news and share information throughout the nation. While many of the articles appeal to owner operators, there is plenty of news for company drivers as well. This magazine aims to tell the truth about driving and this includes a variety of factual and opinion pieces throughout the publication and website.

10-4 Magazine

10-4 Magazine is dedicated to publishing accurate news, but it also maintains a feel-good atmosphere with an entertainment section that includes comics, jokes, and words to live by. The magazines are filled with technical information, beautiful centerfolds, and their website has some fun content as well! 10-4 is committed to making the world a better place and often takes on humanitarian aid projects alongside their efforts to make the lives of truck drivers better through their lighthearted publications.

Road King

Road King has been around for 50 years and has maintained a top spot as a great magazine for truck driving professionals. Road King’s content has won national publication awards and is praised for reliability, accuracy, and usefulness. There are many pieces of interest in Road King from lifestyle, stories, and issues that affect over the road drivers.. Road King magazine has a mission to make the lives of truck drivers easier and more efficient with the latest and most useful news out there.

Final Thoughts

Reading is a great way to relax the mind and stimulate thought, so it’s no wonder why well-designed magazines, such as these, are popular among drivers. If you’re a professional truck driver, we highly recommend checking out some of these magazines at one of your next stops or by viewing their websites, which often have additional content. Expand your knowledge and keep your skills sharp with proven tips and tricks, and access the latest technologies for the industry by flipping or clicking through the pages of these popular magazines!

Sources:
https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2019/06/america-keeps-on-trucking.html#:~:text=More%20than%203.5%20million%20people,occupations%20in%20the%20United%20States.
https://www.fueloyal.com/10-best-trucker-magazines-in-us/

Best Trucking Magazines


https://www.atbs.com/knowledge-hub/trucking-blog/trucking-industry-news

 

First Year Expectations as a Truck Driver

first-year-trucking

Truck driving can be a very rewarding career, but like most jobs, the first year of driving can be difficult to navigate. Fresh out of driving school, and ready to hit the road, you may be expecting high pay, easy customer interactions, and limitless freedom. While some of these expectations are warranted for experienced truck drivers, it takes time to gain know-how that you can use to receive better loads and higher pay.

Even during the trying  first year, you will have positive experiences such as seeing parts of the country that you never knew existed and overcoming challenges that make you a better driver. Surviving the first year removes you from the high turnaround statistics of truck driving and allows you the opportunity to become a dedicated driver. Driving isn’t for everyone, but if you research it and decide to pursue this career, be prepared to face the challenge of the first year and you will be better because of it.

A New Career

Truck driving is a different career from most and it can be quite a nerve-wracking experience when you’re new. The working conditions are the most dramatically different aspects of truck driving in comparison to other careers. You will face long hours of driving that leave you far away from your family and the places you’re familiar with- this can be exciting for some people, but it may take some time to adjust for those dependent on prolonged human interaction or the ability to jump from task to task.

Choosing to begin a career as a truck driver requires some sacrifice, especially during the first years. Money will be tight as experience truly earns pay in the world of truck driving, so your ability to budget will be put to the test. Resilience pays off in most settings and this is incredibly applicable in truck driving. Gaining experience will be a challenge, but facing the challenges posed to you by the demands of the career and employers will allow you the freedom and pay of an experienced driver.

Great Expectations

Some of the most important skills you should nurture as you grow in ability are parking, navigating, and accident prevention. Getting lost is something that happens to every driver at some point in their career. This can pose difficulties in timeliness of deliveries which can result in a decrease in pay. However, time in the seat will help you become better at navigating the world, preparing you for tight corners, narrow streets, and low bridges which will make driving easier in the long run.

Parking a truck can be quite difficult. It takes a lot of skill to park safely in some areas, so make sure to take your time getting the truck parked correctly to avoid damage or injury. Although it may seem like a waste of time, spending a few extra minutes ensuring you are backing precisely into position will save many future headaches. Accident prevention goes hand in hand with navigating and proper truck handling skills, so it is important to ask questions during your training, ensuring you know how to handle challenging situations.

Do not be afraid to ask questions to more experienced drivers so you’re prepared for any circumstances. Many employers will purposely give you tougher routes or customers to test your skills and determine if you will be a worthwhile employee. Show them you have practiced and trained to be excellent at your job.

Final Thoughts

Even the most experienced and well-paid drivers had a tough first year. However, most professional truck drivers will assure you that persevering is worth it. You will gain enough experience to earn better pay, freight, and routes. Driving is a unique and integral career that allows the economy to continue running smoothly, if you think it may be the career for you, do plenty of research and think about the pros and cons. If the pros outweigh the cons, we encourage you to pursue driving and stay encouraged because the longer you do it, the better and easier it gets.

Sources:
https://www.smart-trucking.com/new-truck-driver/
https://www.cdljobs.com/news-notes/news/your-first-year-as-a-truck-driver
https://unitedtruckschool.net/so-youre-a-truck-driver-now-what-5-tips-to-survive-your-first-year/ 

Hobbies That Truck Drivers Can Do On the Road

hobbies-that-truck-drivers-can-do-on-the-road


Driving a truck can be fun, exciting, and a great career.  It can also be a bit dull.  Those long roads that bring such beautiful scenery over every crest, can also bring unrelenting boredom with each stretch.  And it’s not just the hours spent driving.  If you’re living in your truck for days or weeks at a time, not having something to help occupy your mind and hands can make the hours seem like years.  Having a hobby or interest also
relieves stress and anxiety and helps you take a break from the real world.

Photography

Photography is the perfect hobby for someone who spends most of their time out on the road seeing so much of the country.  Good quality digital cameras aren’t as expensive as they used to be and recent cell phone models have excellent cameras built in.  With a laptop and inexpensive software, you can edit and share your art with your family at home.  

Learning an Instrument

If you love music and you’ve always wanted to learn an instrument, the cab of your truck is the perfect place (not while you’re driving, of course).  Guitar, keyboard, trumpet, saxophone, and many more can be learned in the comfort of your cab during your free time.  Buy a book or take lessons online, who knows, maybe you’ll find some other musicians to jam with on the road.

Writing

Whether writing in a journal or creating a fictional story, writing is a great way to express yourself thoughtfully.  Some people find writing to be a therapeutic way of working through feelings, or maybe you simply have dreams of being published one day.  Maybe now is the time to write that Great American Novel or a blog about your life on the road.  

Learn a Language

There’s an abundance of apps, audio books, or videos that can teach you a new language.  The great thing about learning a language with an audiobook is that you can do it on the clock while you’re driving.  Are you ready to learn a new language?  Oui!

Podcasts

Listening to podcasts while you’re driving can help pass the time and you can learn something new.  Whatever your interests, someone makes a podcast about it!  The same is true for audio books.  You can learn something new or lose yourself in some good fiction.

Exercise

Getting exercise on the road is essential to staying in shape when you’re sitting for hours on end.  During breaks, go for a run or a brisk walk.  Bring some small weights to keep in your cab.   Making exercise your new hobby has endless benefits!

Drawing

Life on the road gives the budding artist an abundance of subjects to sketch.  If you’re not naturally artistic, YouTube has lots of videos to show you how to draw.

No matter what you choose, starting a new hobby will help you push out the boredom of life on the road.  

If you’re a driver looking for a great place to work, look no further than Trucker Search.   On Trucker Search’s website, you can post your résumé as well as search the comprehensive database of companies looking for drivers.  It’s a great resource for any driver looking for a great place to work.

Source:  https://www.verywellmind.com/the-importance-of-hobbies-for-stress-relief-3144574

Healthy Meals You Can Have in Your Truck

healthy-meals-you-can-have-in-your-truck


Obesity has long been associated with driving a truck.  It’s a mainly sedentary job and despite the lack of physical activity, it can be exhausting. After a long stretch behind the wheel, drivers want to relax and rest up for the next shift.  Fitting in adequate exercise can be difficult so maintaining a healthy weight can be challenging.  

It doesn’t have to be that way.  With effort and planning, it is possible to make healthy meals while you’re out on the road.  One of the keys to healthy eating on the road is to keep your truck well-stocked with healthy choices.  If you don’t have them on hand, it’ll be harder to resist picking up truck stop food.     

Start by using the right equipment.  Space in a truck is always limited so think about the foods you’d like to make in your truck.  There are numerous cooking options such as a hot pot, microwave, toaster, small slow cooker, portable stove, and two-burner stovetop.  A fridge is a necessity and one with a freezer is best.    

When you make your own meals, you are in total control.  How many calories, how much salt, and  fat are entirely up to you.  Processed foods tend to be higher in all of these things, especially sodium, and if you are overweight and have heart issues or high blood pressure, it’s important to watch your salt intake.  

Breakfast

Protein helps you feel fuller for longer. Having a protein-packed breakfast will help keep you from reaching for snacks.  Some delicious ideas to start the day are:

  • Whole wheat toast with peanut butter (lots of protein)
  • Instant oatmeal
  • Cottage cheese with fresh fruit
  • Whole-grain cereal 
  • Low-fat yogurt with fresh fruit
  • Omelets (throw in your favorite protein, cheeses, and veggies)

Lunch

  • Wraps are great for lunch because you can eat with one hand and fill them with anything you like.  Use lean meats like sliced turkey, or tuna, and add tons of fresh veggies.  Use a low-carb or whole wheat wrap to make it even healthier.
  • Soups (pick the non-creamy, low-sodium varieties)
  • Veggie pasta salad

Snacks

If you have a freezer (you should), stock it with healthy treats like frozen yogurt or fruit bars.  Other handy snacks: 

  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Cheese and whole-grain crackers
  • Dried fruit (great snack that doesn’t need to be refrigerated)
  • Unsalted mixed nuts

Dinner

Meal prep is your friend.  Many websites show you how to make a week’s worth of meals in one day.  Make them the day before your trip and pack them in reusable plastic containers.  Meal prep often involves cooking a protein, like chicken, and then adding rice or noodles, various veggies and sauces and spices, varying them so each meal is different.  It’s an inexpensive way to give yourself some variety in your healthy dinners. 

Rotisserie chicken can be thrown in with some pre-cooked rice and veggies and a little soy sauce, made into a delicious chicken salad wrap, or tossed on a salad. 

Tuna casserole can be cooked on a stovetop or in a slow cooker.  Egg noodles, tuna, cream of mushroom soup, cheese, and frozen peas, and you’ve got a hardy meal.

Mac-n-cheese can be made in a crockpot with cheese, macaroni, milk, butter, and eggs.  It’s not the healthiest, but you’ve got to indulge every now and then.  

When you do eat out on the road, try for healthier options like food that is grilled instead of fried, skip the hamburger bun, and drink water instead of soda.

By planning and prepping your meals before you head out on the road, it’ll be easier to maintain a healthy weight, you’ll have more energy, and you’ll feel better about yourself.  

If you’re looking to start a career in the trucking industry, Trucker Search can help. Connecting truck drivers and employers is what we do.  It’s quick, easy, and it can get you that dream job on the open road. Get started today at TruckerSearch.com or call us at (888)254-3712.